Tag Archives: trace minerals

Trace Minerals: What, Why and Where

In today’s post, we are going to discuss trace minerals; what they are, why we need them and where to get them.

I often talk about vitamins, but your body also requires what we call trace minerals. The reason the word “trace” is used is because you need little to gain huge benefits. I must also mention that there is dangers in having too much of these trace minerals too.

Just consider the fact that our bodies are similar to machinery. That machinery requires certain fluids such as oil, hydraulic fluid, etc… to maintain it in perfect working condition.

I equate trace minerals to the fluids in machinery. Too little and the machine is in danger of overheating; too much and the machine may “blow” seals causing a leak or rupture.

Our bodies need trace minerals much like machinery needs fluids. And while there are some possibilities of “too much,” the majority of humans are running on too few trace minerals. And the primary reason is the growing soils are not as rich in minerals as they once were.

What Are Trace Minerals?

You probably know what most primary minerals are… Minerals that you need more than 100 mg per day:

  • sodium
  • calcium
  • chloride
  • magnesium
  • potassium
  • and phosphorous

Trace minerals are inorganic matter that heat (cooking) cannot damage and we need much smaller amounts; anywhere from 1 to 99 mg per day. But we must have them!

  • copper
  • zinc
  • iron
  • chromium
  • selenium
  • fluoride (this is a trace mineral many people are getting far too much of. It is in water supplies so just say no to it in your toothpaste.)
  • manganese
  • iodine
  • and molybdenum

Why We Need Trace Minerals

Without trying to sound overly scientific, I will just tell you that our bodies are made up of various organic and inorganic matter. We need some of the “metals” to have a proper working system. Let me tell you just a little how each one helps you and where you can get it…

Copper

Copper helps your body make hemoglobin and connective tissues, as well as plays a part in producing energy in your cells.

Studies show that copper deficiencies are low in the United States. You get copper from:

  • nuts and seeds
  • seafood
  • and organ meats

Intake should be from 870 – 900 mcg per day.

Zinc

Zinc deficiency can impair growth in children and birth defects during pregnancy.

Zinc is needed for a healthy immune system; it promotes cell reproduction and tissue growth.

Zinc can be achieved from:

  • nuts and seeds
  • meats
  • peas
  • and eggs

Intake is 8 – 11 mg per day.

Iron

Our hemoglobin requires iron. It is needed to transport oxygen throughout the body.

A deficiency can lead to anemia, fatigue and infections. Excess amount can cause an enlarged liver, skin coloring, diabetes and internal damage.

You can get iron from:

  • meats
  • seeds
  • beans
  • and spinach

The recommended allowance is 8 – 18 mg per day.

Chromium

Chromium helps insulin in your body to use glucose. Deficiency of chromium exhibits diabetic-like symptoms.

Chromium can be attained from:

  • cheese
  • meat
  • peas
  • and eggs

Intake is from 20 -35 mcg per day.

Selenium

Selenium and Vitamin E work as a team. They protect cells and support a healthy immune system.

Normal diets normally provide proper quantities of this trace mineral.

Recommended amounts are 55 mcg per day.

Fluoride

Fluoride does strengthen tooth enamel and bones but too much can cause tooth stains not to mention other problems that most officials will not discuss since it is in most water supplies.

Daily intake should be 3 – 4 mg per day.

Keep in mind that 2 brushings per day of fluoride toothpaste will give you about 1 mg of fluoride.

And you get fluoride from water, tea and fish.

Manganese

Manganese helps in bone formation, metabolism of energy from foods, helps build cartilage and improve immune system response.

You get this trace mineral from:

  • many various fruits
  • vegetables
  • lentils
  • etc…

Daily intake is 1.5 – 2.5 mg per day.

Iodine

Iodine regulates your body heat and energy your system uses. Low iodine can result in weight gain whereas high iodine can make an irregular heartbeat.

The primary source of iodine is salt. It also comes from saltwater fish, potatoes and navy beans.

We need 150 mg of iodine per day.

Molybdenum

No, I can’t pronounce it either…

It is needed as it works in conjunction with riboflavin and uses iron to make red blood cells.

Deficiencies are rare.

You get this trace mineral from:

  • liver
  • grains
  • dairy
  • and beans

Conclusion

Just as you keep track of the various vitamins and primary minerals, you also need to monitor your intake of trace minerals.

You can find many of these trace minerals in the various products sold at this organic company.

Thank you for coming by today.

Here’s to your health and well being! Please share with others.